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Full text of "Decorated book papers : seventeenth to twentieth century"

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SEVENTEENTH TO TWENTIETH CENTURY 



THE COOPER UNION MUSEUM 
FOR THE ARTS OF DECORATION 




\ rivUfti^y 






ACKNOWLEDGMENT 

In assembling material for the exhibition, the Museum has received 
helpful suggestions and information from the following, to whom 
are given most grateful thanks: 

Sidney M. Cockerell 

Harrison Elliott 

Miss Bertha Frick 

Miss Ethel Graham 

George Nelson, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Seymour Slive 

Paul Standard 



Copyright 19)4 by The Cooper Union Museum for the Arts of Decoration 



INTRODUCTION 



By Decorated Book Papers are meant those sheets intended for the end 
papers or covers of books but occasionally used as lining papers for 
boxes and small articles of furniture. 

These papers were printed from woodblocks, made with paste, or marbled. 
The fifteenth- and sixteenth-century woodblock papers were designed for a 
specific book cover and were not, as were later woodblock papers, decorative 
in the sense that they could be used for other purposes. Some seventeenth- 
century patterns (Nos. 1, 2), whose designs were evidently influenced by 
contemporary leather bindings, could be used for any book or pamphlet; but 
it was not until the eighteenth century that decorated book papers or a 
repeated pattern were first printed. 

The most striking printed book papers were those made from the early 
eighteenth century in Nuremberg, Augsburg and Furth and known as Dutch 
Gilt papers because the Dutch imported them and exported them to the rest 
of Europe. Almost identical papers were made in Bassano. Dutch Gilt 
papers are printed from either woodblock or metal plates, the printed pat- 
tern usually quite heavily embossed. Two general types may be noted: one 
in which the design is printed and gilded over a sheet that had been pre- 
viously covered with one solid color (Nos. 6, 7, 12); in the other the block, 
or plate, is inked with several colors which more or less correspond to the 
design, these are printed at once on a sheet that had already been gilded 
(Nos. 18, 22, 23). The range of patterns is a wide one with influence of tex- 
tile design that may be recognized in papers which recall damasks (No. 20), 
brocades (No. 19), and embroidery (No. 23, Fig. 6). But in these the tech- 
nique of cutting the block or plate has permitted the craftsman to use a finer 
line and produce a more delicate design than those found in textiles. More 
closely imitative are those papers which simulate vellum (Nos. 8, Fig. 3, 10) 
or leather (Nos. 9, 32). In these the embossed design creates an almost 
identical effect as tooling in the leather. And in sheets with a more loosely 
organized design, figures similar to those used by woodcuts, or for broadsides, 
can be seen (Nos. 14, 15). Though Dutch Gilt papers used these and other 
sources of design, in execution they were in no way inferior. They were 
doubtless less expensive than the rich textiles they often imitated, but it must 
not be thought that they were entirely a poor man's substitute. They were 
used as end papers in finely bound books (Nos. 34, 36, 38) and may be found 
even in royal (Nos. 35, 40) and Papal (No. 13) bindings. 

These papers were conservative in their use of patterns. A paper will 
usually be some years later than a textile with a similar pattern. Though 



fanciful in design, exotic motifs are rare; occasionally a Turk or a Chinese 
is seen, but not as frequently as might be expected in such a purely decorative 
art. This may be due to the provincial location of their origin or to the 
innate conservatism of the craftsman. 

Earlier than the Dutch Gilt but less spectacular are the productions of 
the dominotiers of France. They were so named from the popular religious 
pictures, dominos, that in earlier centuries had represented their principal 
production. They made marbled papers as well as printed sheets. These 
sheets were used as wall coverings and, in smaller patterns, for books and 
linings for furniture. They were printed from woodblocks and colored by 
stencil (No. 37). As the patterns were widely used and the sheets seldom 
labeled, identification is usually not possible. Orleans and Paris were the 
two centers of manufacture. It is often difficult to distinguish between 
French and Italian printed papers of the eighteenth and nineteenth cen- 
turies. The most considerable producer of Italian papers was the firm of 
Remondini, established at Bassano in 1649 and issuing papers until 1861. 
Some of their blocks are still being used. These papers, quite Venetian in 
their sumptuous colors, at first were imitative of textiles (Nos. 51, Fig. 4, 52). 
Later their design seemed more closely related to that of wall paper (No. 53), 
but many were quite unique and even bizarre in their effects (No. 58). But 
in general during the later eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, French 
and Italian papers no longer attempted to simulate other materials and tex- 
tures but instead merely drew on patterns used in wall papers (No. 46), 
printed textiles (Nos. 54, 76), and even lace (No. 55). This was quite 
changed in the latter part of the century when the increased use of the 
machine influenced the production of decorated book covers as it did all 
the decorative arts. Papers were still eclectic in design but now the imita- 
tion of textiles lacked the naivete of earlier efforts and offended by its slick- 
ness; cheap paper pretending to be moire (No. 68) is hardly as satisfying, 
though it may be a closer imitation, as earlier and richer papers. 

At the mid-century, however, impressive papers were still produced. 
These often seem to be miniature wallpapers (No. 64), some were flocked 
(Nos. 59, 60) and they had a slight touch of the over-extended fantasy so 
often found in decorative art of the Second Empire. Opposed to these mere- 
triciously machine-made papers of the end of the century some contem- 
poraneous printed book papers reflect a return to medieval simplicity, that 
bare-handed revolt against the machine (No. 66). But the popularity of these 
was limited and they were soon outnumbered by papers glittering with 
tinsel and color (No. 63). By this time the variety of end papers was wide; 
in addition to those just mentioned end papers carrying advertising were 
used (No. 62), and pictorial end papers with a subject related to the content 



of the book. Because of the elaborate machinery involved, printed papers 
are not as popular with the artist-craftsman of today as are marbled or paste 
papers. However, since 1920 the Curwen Press of England has commissioned 
a pleasantly designed series known as St. Albans papers (Nos. 69, 70) which 
have been popular as end papers as well as covers. 

Paste papers are almost as old as the block-printed; they originated in the 
sixteenth century and the same techniques are used today. In some papers 
the colored paste is applied to the papers and printed with a block cut in 
relief, and the pattern results from the paste that has been displaced 
(No. 116). If the paper is printed with an intaglio-cut block the pattern 
appears darker and more clearly defined against a lighter ground (No. 106). 
In another method the paste is applied to the block, as ink (No. 115). In 
another the sheet is not printed but drawn upon with a comb leaving a 
pattern of parallel lines (No. 119). These methods may be combined (No. 
112), and rollers, brushes, or sponges (No. 113), used. Two sheets covered 
with colored paste may be pressed together and pulled apart to make two 
"pulled paste" sheets (No. 105). Because paste papers offer almost maximum 
flexibility of design and the patterns can be controlled and repeated to a 
degree not possible in marbling, and elaborate equipment is not necessary, 
paste papers are popular today for end papers and bindings (No. 128). 

A marbled paper, unlike a printed one, is unique. Only one sheet can be 
marbled from the colors which have been floated upon the size. The same 
colors may be used for another sheet but the design can never be absolutely 
identical. 

The art of marbling paper seems to have originated in Persia, probably in 
the fifteenth century; but it was soon practised in Turkey (Nos. 92, 93) and 
when marbled papers were used in Europe, from the late sixteenth century, 
they were known as Turkish. Though the variety of marbled patterns is 
infinite the patterns are classified according to distinct categories. One of 
the earliest known is a coarsely combed pattern called Old Dutch (No. 83), 
and the French Curl, or Snail pattern is almost as old (No. 79). Spanish 
marbled papers (No. 91, Fig. 5) originated in the seventeenth century; their 
moire effect is achieved by lowering the paper onto the marbling tray 
unevenly. The broken effect in Stormont paper (No. 82) is created by 
adding turpentine to the color. In the early nineteenth century the fine 
combed patterns known as Nonpareil was first used (No. 94). These were 
first made like any other marbled papers but towards the end of the century 
were made by a machine, the papers being glazed by passing through hot 
rollers. Nonpareil and similar rather mechanically executed papers were 
widely used from the middle of the century and well into the twentieth. In 
the last quarter of the nineteenth century the self-consciously artistic Morris 



papers (No. 90) were first made; they represent the beginning of revival of 
interest on the possibilities of marbled paper. Today marbled papers, made 
as they were in the seventeenth century, are as varied in design and excel- 
lent in quality as ever in their history. The disciplined patterns which are 
the invention of Douglas Cockerell (Nos. 97-99) represent one contribution 
of the twentieth century to this art. French (No. 102), German (No. 96), 
and Swedish (No. 103) papers illustrate the widespread present interest in 
marbling and the excellence of the work done. In some examples (No. 101) 
marbled papers achieve a fantastic effect, perhaps more to be admired than 
imitated, never before realized. 

In design paste papers are the most original for they can be said to imitate 
nothing. The marbled papers' origin is revealed in their name, but marbles 
as these were never found in nature. Printed papers vary from precise 
imitations of the texture and pattern of other materials to fantastic sheets 
that please rather in their originality. The uniqueness of almost every 
sheet, the variety of design, the consistently high level of craftsmanship and 
a slightly illusive air of the bizarre constitute the attraction of decorated 
book papers. But perhaps most worthy of remark is the manner in which 
this craft, while maintaining its excellences so well developed in previous 
centuries, continues in our own day to find original and beautiful modes 
of expression. 

William Osmun 



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Fig. 1. Block-Printed Paper 
Germany 
About 1650 
The Cooper Union Museum 



Fig. 2. Dispatch Case 

Lined with paste paper 
France 

Mid-eighteenth centur 
The Cooper Union M 




Fig. 3. Dutch Gilt Paper 

Monogram of Peter II of Russia 

S. Hatchele 

Germany, Augsburg 

1727-1730 

The Cooper Union Museum 




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Fie. 4. Block-Printed Pater 
Remondini 
Italy 

1820-1830 
Lent by the 

Rosamond B. Loving Collection, 
The Harvard College Library 



Fig 5. Spanish Marbled Paper 
Spain (?) 

Probably second half of the nineteenth century 
Lent by the Rosamond B. Loring Collection 
The Harvard College Librar\ 





Fig. 6. Dutch Gilt Paper 
Germany 
1700-1750 
The Cooper Union Museum 



CATALOGUE 



(The numbers set in parentheses after the description of the objects refer to 
the owners of the objects, as shown in the list of Contributors to the Exhibition 
printed on page 11. An asterisk (*) indicates that the object is illustrated.) 



PRINTED PAPERS 

1. Block-printed paper; Germany; 1625- 
1633 (1) 
*2. Block-printed paper; Germany; about 
1650 (1) 

3. New Testament, printed and embossed 
end papers; England, London; 1658 (5) 

4. Gebett Buechlein, bound in silver with 
block-printed end papers; Germany, 
Cologne; 1657 (1) 

5. "Dutch Gilt" paper; Aloys Dessauer; 
Germany, Aschaffenburg; 1700-1750 (1) 

6. "Dutch Gilt" paper; I. G. Eckarts; Ger- 
many, Nuremberg; 1700-1750 (1) 

7. "Dutch Gilt" paper; Eckart'sche Bunte 
Papier Fabrik; Germany, Nuremberg; 
1700-1750 (1) 

*8. "Dutch Gilt" paper with monogram of 
Peter II of Russia; S. Hatchele; Ger- 
many, Augsburg; 1727-1730 (1) 
9. "Dutch Gilt" paper; Johann Carl Munck; 
Germany, Augsburg; 1700-1750 (1) 

10. "Dutch Gilt" paper; Johann Carl Munck; 
Germany, Augsburg; 1700-1750 (1) 

11. "Dutch Gilt" paper; Johann Carl Munck; 
Germany, Augsburg; 1700-1750 (1) 

12. "Dutch Gilt" paper; Johann Michael 
Munck; Germany, Augsburg; late eight- 
eenth century (1) 

13. Pads Triumphum, "Dutch Gilt" end 
papers by Johann Michael Munck of 
Augsburg; Italy, Rome; 1760 (5) 

14. "Dutch Gilt" paper with twenty-eight 
saints; G. N. Renner and Abel; Ger- 
many, Nuremberg; 1700-1750 (9) 

15. "Dutch Gilt" paper; Paul Reymund; 
Germany, Nuremberg; 1700-1750 (1) 

16. "Dutch Gilt" paper; Paul Reymund; 
Germany, Nuremberg; 1700-1750 (1) 

17. "Dutch Gilt" paper with four alphabets; 
Paul Reymund; Germany, Nuremberg; 
1700-1750 (1) 

18. "Dutch Gilt" paper; Germany, prob- 
ably Augsburg; 1700-1750 (1) 

19-33. "Dutch Gilt" paper; Germany; 1700- 
1750 (1) (23 illustrated as Figure 3) 

34. Essais de Morales, volume two, "Dutch 
Gilt" end papers; Nichole; France, Paris; 
1714-1715 (2) 

35. Almanach Royal, "Dutch Gilt" end 
papers; bound by Louis Doncour 
(d.1769); France, Paris; 1747 (5) 

36. Plans et Desseins des Batiments, Cas- 
cades, et Fontaines don Charles, Land- 
grave de Hesse . . ., by G. F. Guernieri, 
"Dutch Gilt" end papers; Italy; 1749 (1) 



37. Domino block-printed and stencil-col- 
ored paper; Chez les Associers (sic); 
France, Paris; 1750-1762 (1) 

38. Das . . . Neue Testament, bound in vel- 
vet and silver-gilt, "Dutch Gilt" end 
papers; Switzerland, Zurich; 1752 (1) 

39. Orazione Divotissime a S. Francesco . . ., 
block-printed end papers; Italy, Rome; 
1740-1760 (7) 

40. L'office de la Semaine Sainte, "Dutch 
Gilt" end papers; bound by Guillaume 
de Sprez; France, Paris; 1757 (5) 

41. Contes de la Fontaine, "Dutch Gilt" end 
papers; Netherlands, Amsterdam; 1762 
(7) 

42. Tragoediae, Seneca, 1480, block-printed 
end papers; Italy, Ferrara; Binding, 
France; 1775-1800 (5) 

43. Discorso . . ., Dante Alighieri (1265-1321), 
covered in block-printed paper; Italy, 
Florence; eighteenth century (2) 

44. Le Nozze D'Ercole, block-printed end 
papers; Italy, Venice; second half of the 
eighteenth century (1) 

45. Copy book, bound in "Dutch Gilt" 
paper; England; late eighteenth century 

(1) 

46. Printed paper; France; 1790-1820 (1) 

47. Block-printed paper; possibly Remon- 
dini; Italy; about 1800 (3) 

48. Calendario Manual . . ., block-printed 
end papers; Spain, Madrid; 1820 (1) 

49. Anweisung zum Stricken und illumi- 
niren . . .", bound in block-printed 
paper; Germany, Halle; first third of the 
nineteenth century (1) 

50. Block-printed paper; Remondini; Italy; 
1820-1830 (3) 

*51. Block-printed paper; Remondini; Italy; 
1820-1830 (3) 
52. Block-printed paper; Remondini; Italy; 
1820-1830 (3) 
53-56. Block-printed paper; Italy; 1830-1840 (1) 

57. Printed paper; France (?); about 1850 (1) 

58. Printed and embossed paper; France 
(?); about 1850 (1 ) 

59. Printed flocked silver paper; France (?); 
about 1850 (1) 

60. Printed flocked silver paper; France (?); 
about 1850 (1) 

61. Embossed silver paper; France (?); about 
1850 (1) 

62. The Lady's Almanac . . ., end papers 
printed in gold; United States, Boston; 
1854 (1) 



63. Les Interets Commerciaux de la Russie 
by G. D. A. Hartmann, chromo-litho 
graphed end papers; bound by Des 
pierres; France, Paris; 1857 (2) 

64. Chrome-lithographed paper; France 
1850-1870 (1) 

65. Chrome-lithographed paper; France 
1850-1870 (1) 

66. Two printed papers; in the style of Wal- 
ter Crane; England; about 1880 (3) 

67. Printed paper; England, London; 1884 

(3) 

68. The Booke of Common Proper, 1620, 
printed end papers in imitation of 
ribbed silk; bound by Cedric Chivers; 
England, Bath; binding about 1900 (5) 

69. Printed "St. Albans" paper; Paul Nash; 
The Curwen Press; England; 1920-1930 

(1) 

70. Printed "St. Albans" paper; The Curwen 
Press; England; 1920-1930 (1) 

71. Printed papers; O. de Mandrot de Freu- 
denreich; Mandrot Papier; Switzerland; 
about 1940 (1) 

72. Printed paper; O. de Mandrot de Freu- 
denreich; Mandrot Papier; Switzerland; 
about 1940 (1) 

73. Paper printed in reserve (?) process; 
Ingeborg Borjeson; Sweden; about 1940 

(1) 

74. Block-printed papers; Rizzi; Italy, Va- 
rese; about 1940 (from eighteenth cen- 
tury blocks) (1) 

75. Block-printed paper; La Laboratorio 
Italiano Manifattura Artistica; Italy, 
Florence; 1940-1950 (2) 

76. Two block -printed papers; France; eight- 
eenth century (6) 

MARBLED PAPERS 

77. Seven sheets illustrating the process of 
marbling; Douglas Cockerell; England, 
Letchworth; about 1910 (9) 

78. Drawn marbled paper; France (?); 1650- 
1675 (3) 

79. La Dioptrique Oculaire, by Cherubin 
D'Orleans, three different marbled papers 
as end papers; France; 1671 (1) 

80. Two marbled papers; Colonial America; 
1750-1780 (3) 

81. Receuil de Difjerents Bouquets . . ., en- 
gravings by Jean Pillement (1728-1808), 
drawn and combed marbled end papers; 
France, Paris; 1760 (binding late nine- 
teenth century) (1) 

82. . . • New Designs for Chimney Pieces 
by Thomas Milton, Stormont marbled 
end papers; England, London: 1766 (1) 

83. Les Baisers . . ., combed marbled end 
papers; The Netherlands, The Hague; 
1770 (1) 

84. . . . A Tour in England and Scotland . . ., 
by Thomas Newte, drawn marbled end 
papers; England, London; 1791 (1) 



Les Amours de Psyche . . ., as told by 
Jean de La Fontaine, bound in oil 
marbled paper, "Spanish" marbled end 
papers and fore-edges; France, Paris; 
1795 (1) 

Theorica de la Pintura, by Castro y 
Velasco, marbled end papers; Spain, 
Madrid; 1795 (1) 

A General History of Quadrupeds, Stor- 
mont marbled end papers; England, 
Newcastle-upon-Tyne; 1800 (1) 
Guia Politica y Militar . . ., marbled end 
papers; Spain, Madrid; 1823 (1) 
Das Veilchen, Ein Taschenbuch, with 
slipcase of combed marbled paper; Aus- 
tria, Vienna; 1829 (1) 
Watered marbled "Morris" paper; Eng- 
land; 1893 (3) 

Spanish marbled paper; Spain; probably 
second half of the nineteenth century (3) 
Combed marbled paper; Turkey (?); 
nineteenth century (6) 
Book cover, red goatskin, stamped tooled 
and gilt, lined with Stormont marbled 
paper; Turkey; late nineteenth century 

(1) 

Serrurie, by N. Guerard, Nonpareil 

marbled end papers; France; papers, late 

nineteenth century (1) 

Two oil marbled papers; Frau Maria 

Henneberger; Germany, Munich; 1929 

(3) 

Oil marbled paper; Germany; 1930-1940 

(9) 

Combed marbled paper; Douglas Cock- 
erell and Son; England, Letchworth; 
about 1930 (1) 

Peacock marbled paper; Douglas Cocker- 
ell and Son; England, Letchworth; about 
1930 (1) 

Combed marbled paper; Douglas Cock- 
erell and Son; England, Letchworth; 
1953 (1) 

"Kalaba," marbled paper; M. M. Calaba; 
United States, New Rochelle; 1930-1950 
(3) 

Marbled paper, "Still Life"; Guy de Sen; 
Denmark; 1930-1950 (3) 
Combed marbled paper; Cabrol; La 
Maison du Beau Papier; France, Paris; 
about 1950 (1) 

"Fantasy" marbled paper; Ingeborg Bor- 
jeson; Sweden; about 1950 (1) 
Two marbled papers; Necmeddin Okyoy, 
Turkey, Uskiidar; about 1950 (1) 



PASTE PAPERS 

105. Pulled paste paper; Germany (?); about 
1700 (3) 

106. Dictionnaire Universel des Drogues 
Simples, by Nicolas Lemery, printed 
paste end papers; France, Paris; 1733 (2) 

107. Paper printed in paste and gold; Ger- 
many; 1750-1760 (1) 



*108. Dispatch Case, red morocco tooled and 
gilt, lined with paste paper; France; mid- 
eighteenth century (1) 

109. Zu des Roemischen Koenigs . . ., by J. M. 
Iven, stamped gilt paper covers, paste 
end papers; Germany, Mainz; 1764 (1) 

110. Relacion del Valle de Aran, by Francisco 
Gracia, paste end papers; Spain; 1793 (1) 

111. Printed paste paper; France; eighteenth 
century (6) 

112. Four drawn combed paste papers; France 
and Italy; 1780-1820 (3) 

113. "The Cabinet of Natural History," by 
Charles Willson Peale (1741-1827), paste 
end papers; United States, Philadelphia; 
1830 (1) 

114. Printed paste paper; Germany (?); 1830- 
1840 (I) 

115. Printed paste paper; Germany, Bremen; 
1937 (3) 

116. Paste on silver paper; F. M. Kaufman; 
Germany, Augsburg; 1937 (3) 

117. Combed paste paper; Rosamund B. 
Loring; United States; 1940-1950 (9) 

118. Two paste papers; R. Hunter Middleton; 
United States, Chicago; 1954 (4) 

119. Two combed paste papers; Veronica 
Ruzicka; United States, Boston; 1954 (8) 

SAMPLE BOOKS AND BOOK COVERS 

120. Pair of book covers, tooled and gilded 
calf; France; 1700-1750 (5) 

121. Sample book Livre de Desseins de . . ., 
block -printed papers; France; late eight- 
eenth century (3) 

122. Sample book De la Fabrique de Meslay, 
printed papers; France, Paris; about 
1850 (3) 

123. Memoires . . . de Henri de Mesmes, 
(1532-1596), bound in stamped and 
gilded leather; edited by Edouard 
Fremy; France, Paris; late nineteenth 
century (2) 

124. Sample book, printed papers; Tamm & 
Co.; United States, New York; about 
1900 (3) 

125. Sample book "Sagan paper," printed 
papers; Japan Paper Company; Ger- 
many, Leipzig; 1929 (3) 



126. Sample book, Italian woodblock papers; 
Japan Paper Company; Italy; about 1930 

(3) 

127. Sample book, printed and marbled 
papers; Sangorski & Sutcliffe; England, 
London; 1930-1940 (3) 

128. A Witness Tree, by Robert Frost, cov- 
ered in printed paste paper; Veronica 
Ruzicka; United States, Boston; 1942 (8) 

129. Sample book of printed paste papers; 
Veronica Ruzicka; United States, Boston; 
1954 (8) 

WOODBLOCKS 

130. Woodblock, metal strips; probably Ger- 
many; 1700-1750 (9) 

131. Woodblock, metal pins; probably Ger- 
many; 1700-1750 (9) 

132. Woodblock; Germany; 1725-1775 (9) 

133. Woodblock, metal pins; probably French; 
1725-1775 (9) 

134. Woodblock, metal pins; Italy (?) France 
(?); 1750-1800 (9) 

135. Woodblock, metal pins and strips; prob- 
ably France; 1750-1800 (9) 

136. Woodblock; probably Germany; 1770- 
1810 (9) 

137. Woodblock; Germany; 1800-1850 (9) 

138. Woodblock; probably Germany; 1800- 
1850 (9) 

139. Woodblock, metal pins and strips; 
France or Italy; 1845 (9) 

TEXTILES 

140. Voided velvet; Italy; late sixteenth-early 
seventeenth century (1) 

141. Indigo resist-dyed cotton; Colonial 
America; first half of the eighteenth 
century (1) 

142. Embroidered silk panel; France, mid- 
eighteenth century (1) 

143. Printed cotton; France; eighteenth cen- 
tury (1) 

144. Printed cotton; England; 1840-1850 (1) 

145. Printed cotton; France; nineteenth cen- 
tury (1) 



SELECTED REFERENCES 

jfVom the Cooper Union Libraries 



Ackerraann's Repository of Arts, Literature, 
Commerce, Manufactures, Fashions, and Poli- 
tics. London, R. Ackermann, 1809-1813. Col- 
lection of pages mounted with paper and 
textile samples bound into one volume. 

Adams, Charles R. Some notes on the art of 
marbling paper in the seventeenth century. 
New York, New York Public Library, 1947 
(Bulletin of the New York Public Library, 
July, 1947). 

Aga-Oglu, Mehmet. Persian bookbindings of 
the fifteenth century. Ann Arbor, University 
of Michigan Press, 1935. 

Arseven, Celal Esad. Les arts d^coratifs turcs. 
Istanbul, Milli Egitim Basimevi, 194? "Le 
papier," pp. 320-321. 

Beauchamps, J. de, and Rouveyre, fidouard. 
Guide du libraire-antiquaire et du biblio- 
phile. Paris, Rouveyre, 1884-85. 

Bouchot, Henri F. Le livre; l'illustration — la 
reliure. Paris, Quantin, 188? 

Ciba Review, no. 72, Feb. 1949 

Cockerell, Douglas. Bookbinding, and the care 
of books. New York, Appleton, 1902. 

Cockerell, Sydney M. Marbling paper. Craft 
Horizons, vol. 12, pp. 32-35, Jan. 1952. 

Diehl, Edith. Bookbinding, its background and 
technique. New York, Rinehart, 1946. 2 vols. 
"End papers," vol. 2, pp. 67-85. 

Dossie, Robert. The handmaid to the arts. 2d. 

ed. London, J. Nourse, 1764. 2 vols. "Of the 

method of preparing and colouring marbled 

papers," vol. 2, pp. 413-417. 
Grand-Carteret, John. Vieux papiers, vieilles 

images. Paris, Le Vasseur, 1896. 

Gruel, L£on. Manuel historique et biblio- 
graphique de l'amateur de reliures. Paris, 
Gruel et Engelmann, 1887. 

Hughes, G. Bernard. English marbled papers. 
Country Life, vol. 112, pp. 2100-2101, Dec. 26, 
1952. 



Hunter, Dard. Papermaking; the history and 
technique of an ancient craft. 2d. ed. New 
York, Knopf, 1947. 

Labarre, E. J. A dictionary of paper and paper- 
making terms. Amsterdam, N. V. Swets & 
Zeitlinger, 1937. 

Lehmann-Haupt, Hellmut, editor. Bookbind- 
ing in America; three essays. Portland, Me., 
Southworth-Anthoensen Press, 1941. 

Loring, Rosamond B. Decorated book papers, 
being an account of their designs and fash- 
ions. Cambridge, Mass., Harvard College 
Library, 1942. 

McClelland, Nancy V. The dominotiers, in- 
ventors of wallpaper. Arts if Decoration, Nov. 
1923, pp. 28-29, 59, 78-79. 

New York. Metropolitan Museum of Art. A 
guide to an exhibition of the arts of the 
book. By W. M. Ivins, Jr. New York, 1924. 

Nilsson, Axel. Bokbandsdekorens stilutveckling. 
Goteborg, Rohsska Konstslojdmuseet, 1922. 

Pope, Arthur Upham, editor. A survey of Per- 
sian art. London, Oxford University Press, 
1938-39. 6 vols. "Marbleized or Abri paper," 
by Taherzade Behzad, vol. 3, pp. 1924-1926. 

Pourrat, Henri. Die alten Papiermiihlen in der 
Auvergne. Vienna, Herbert Reichner, 193? 

Recueil de planches sur les sciences, les arts 
liberaux et les arts m£chaniques. Paris, 
Briasson, 1762-72. 11 vols. "Marbreur de 
papier," 2 plates, and "Papeterie," 13 plates, 
vol. 5. 

Secrets concernant les arts et metiers. Paris, 
Moutard, 1790. 4 vols. "Contenant divers 
procedes concernant le papier, les livres & 
autres ouvrages en papier," vol. 3, pp. 
682-746. 

Vachon, Marius. Les arts et les industries du 
papier en France. Paris, Librairies-impri- 
meries r^unies, 1894. 

WHITNEY N. MORGAN 



10 



CONTRIBUTORS 

Jo the Exhibition 

The Cooper Union Museum (1) 

lucien goldschmidt (2) 

The Rosamond B. Loring Collection 
of the Harvard College Library (3) 

R. Hunter Middleton (4) 

The Pierpont Morgan Library (5) 

The Rhode Island School of Design, 
Museum of Art (6) 

The Rosenbach Foundation (7) 

Miss Veronica Ruzicka (8) 

The Special Collections of the 
Columbia University Libraries (9) 



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